How To Move From A State Of Worry To Calm

April 16, 2017
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“Calm Is A Super Power!”

Excessive worrying about everyday things can create a sense of drama about daily life, characterized by obsession about the past or predictions about future events. Worrying can exert increased stress on the mind and body; it can result in people getting trapped in their self-created ‘real’ world of worry.

There are certain simple ways in which people can move from a state of worry to calmness. Below are some powerful strategies that can be employed to free oneself of continuous worry and restore inner calm:

  • Acknowledge the abnormal thoughts and worryingturn worry to calm

    • Worry and anxiety about the future can dissipate when we stop encouraging it with fear and instead honor them with acknowledgement about their existence. Regularly observing and acknowledging the feelings and thoughts in a non-judging manner can actually help subside the intrusive thoughts, worrying, and anxiety.
    • The 1987 well-known ‘white bear experiment’ has proven that asking people to stop thinking about certain things actually has the opposite effect. Hence, patients need to avoid resisting the presence of worry as doing so can elevate the associated distress. Instead recognize their existence and let the worrisome thoughts flow through.
  • Move the focus from the anxious thoughts to problem solving
    • One of the best ways to overcome excessive worrying is to engage in positive action instead of wasting energy on distressing thoughts. Stop being at the mercy of inevitability and become a catalyst for transformation!
    • You can begin my differentiating between things that are within your control and those which are not in your control. You can then move your focus to one controllable problem that can be immediately addressed by you. This will help change the outcome of the future that is the cause of worry.
    • For example, if you are worried about your attire for a job interview, then change into the best possible professional clothes that you can find and afford. This small and simple action can help move focus from a passive state of worry to a calm, proactive approach and lay the foundations of a momentum that will ensure more productive behaviors.
  • Calming the body and mind
    • Anxiety and worrying can affect the mind as well as cause physical symptoms like dry mouth, increased heartbeat, sleeping problems, stomach upset, and/or increased perspiration, etc. Such adverse physical symptoms can then feed your anxiety and worsen the state of worry.
    • Sufferers need to take steps to calm the body and the mind. Becoming aware about our feelings and our physical presence can help pacify the mind. Take a moment and just look around; you will see your surroundings and get connected to the physical world. It will make you realize that everything is ok at the present moment and thus help you move from a state of worry to calm.
    • Practicing mindfulness can help you get in tune with all that is happening around you. Being mindful silences anxious thoughts and decreases the body’s stress responses.
    • Patients may engage in deep breathing exercises, yoga, relaxation techniques, or even go for a jog; this will help calm the body and subsequently ease the mind as well.

Put these steps into action today to begin turning your focus from what you should worry about, to how calm and balanced you can feel. Remember, where focus goes energy flows.

The End The Anxiety Program Is A CBT Based Approach To Helping Anxiety Sufferers Turn Fear To Freedom In The Fastest Way Possible.

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2 comments on “How To Move From A State Of Worry To Calm

  1. Excellent .Thank you as I fight health anxiety practically every day..Tony

    • A very important podcast tomorrow for health anxiety sufferers Tony, would love your feedback when it comes out on this site.